Anne Josephine Kingsley Dawborn was born in Melbourne on the 9th of March 1931. She graduated as an Occupational Therapist in the 1953, beginning her career at the Repatriation Hospital in Melbourne, before traveling to Canada via the UK and New York to work at the Kingston Psychiatric Hospital in Ontario.    Returning to Australia several years later, Anne worked at The Alfred Hospital and soon became Head of the Occupational Therapy Department.     In 1972 Anne decided to train as a primary school teacher, bringing her creativity into every lesson.  She retired from teaching in 1988.  She was a member of the Hawthorn Art Society and the Victorian Art society and exhibited her oil paintings in various galleries around Melbourne.    In the 1980’s Anne developed her life long love of drawing, sketching and painting in water and oils.  Painting and sketching gave Anne much pleasure and she loved to share this sense of creativity with her friends and relatives.  Anne believed in the therapeutic nature of engaging in the arts, in any form, and facilitated others to be creative in her role as Occupational Therapist, Teacher, Relative and Friend.  This extended to the arts in health care and education settings.    Many conversations over the years about the importance of this led to the bequest being used to establish a small pilot at the Royal Hobart Hospital and this in turn created Inscape Tas.  Thanks to Anne’s legacy, the pilot was immensely successful and has led to more programs being delivered. Anne continued to paint and draw until just before the end of her life and passed away on the 13th November 2013.

Anne Josephine Kingsley Dawborn was born in Melbourne on the 9th of March 1931. She graduated as an Occupational Therapist in the 1953, beginning her career at the Repatriation Hospital in Melbourne, before traveling to Canada via the UK and New York to work at the Kingston Psychiatric Hospital in Ontario.

Returning to Australia several years later, Anne worked at The Alfred Hospital and soon became Head of the Occupational Therapy Department. 

In 1972 Anne decided to train as a primary school teacher, bringing her creativity into every lesson.  She retired from teaching in 1988.  She was a member of the Hawthorn Art Society and the Victorian Art society and exhibited her oil paintings in various galleries around Melbourne.

In the 1980’s Anne developed her life long love of drawing, sketching and painting in water and oils.  Painting and sketching gave Anne much pleasure and she loved to share this sense of creativity with her friends and relatives.  Anne believed in the therapeutic nature of engaging in the arts, in any form, and facilitated others to be creative in her role as Occupational Therapist, Teacher, Relative and Friend.  This extended to the arts in health care and education settings.

Many conversations over the years about the importance of this led to the bequest being used to establish a small pilot at the Royal Hobart Hospital and this in turn created Inscape Tas.  Thanks to Anne’s legacy, the pilot was immensely successful and has led to more programs being delivered. Anne continued to paint and draw until just before the end of her life and passed away on the 13th November 2013.

OUR HISTORY

Initiated by the bequest of Anne Josephine Kingsley Dawborn, Inscape was the brainchild of Anne’s niece; Jacqui Dawborn who was keen to continue her aunt’s work that linked creativity with the health sector.

Consultation with the Royal Hobart Hospital began in August 2014 and after four months of presentations, meetings and a final proposal for the six-month pilot project; it was finally given the go-ahead.

In January 2015 the project was successfully implemented on the Acute Older Person’s Unit (AOPU), now called Ward 6A.  This unit cares for older people with acute illness, including many with dementia and delirium.

The pilot project included music, visual arts, participatory art making and storytelling.  It aimed to improve the experience of older people, their family, carers and staff through engagement in art activities.  The community development approach ensured that the whole AOPU (Ward 6A) community was included.